East Riding words

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East Riding words

Postby plook » Tue Aug 07, 2007 9:02 am

Where did these words come from?
Siling down = Heavy Rain
Side table= Clear the table

Quotations from my Gran

If you had a shiney nose-my gran would say it shines like a petty door on a frosy morning.

If she didn't like someone after they left she would say fair wind to his arse.

If someone was full of themselves she would say hes a picturonit.

Different people with different traits had special names so we kids didn't now who she was talking about:
Mr Gotosleep
Piano fingers
Tanner
Bertha Bunflower
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Postby Turnip Town » Tue Aug 07, 2007 11:03 am

I must say you do hear quite a few gems round here. I like the fact that, as in Ryedale, people round here don't seem to use words like 'to', 'of', 'in', 'and', etc.

Put t'money on t'table.

Shut t'door.

Put t'fire on.

And people seem to say 'fost' rather than 'first'.

'Appen ah do' - meaning ?

I've heard Fridaythorpe pronounced as 'Frithrop'.

Breakfast appears to be 'break'urst'.

I love it, makes the english language richer!
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Postby dbh1961 » Tue Aug 07, 2007 11:47 am

I'm originally from Leeds (but now escaped!)

My Grandad's favourite saying was Tin Tin Tin, which would properly be 't i'nt in t' tin, meaning it isn't in the tin! He would use this for anything he couldn't find, although why he expected it to be in the tin in the first place was anybody's guess.

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Postby plook » Tue Aug 07, 2007 2:31 pm

Ryedale!! thats where they call potted meat pate a bit like Moldscroft and as for escaping from Leeds we wont hod it agist the.
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Postby plook » Tue Aug 07, 2007 2:33 pm

PS
Shut t'door is posh- its put wud in oil.
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Postby zoe j » Wed Aug 08, 2007 1:19 am

I was listening to a radio programme ages ago, it was about the East Riding Dialect and it was said that a lot of words came down from Danish. In Jutland (denmark) 'siling down' was the word they used (in old danish) for a steady downpour. We were colonised and settled by the vikings. We were part of Danelaw.
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Postby Turnip Town » Wed Aug 08, 2007 8:00 am

It always tickles me when I hear people say things like 'yowth' meaning 'youth' and 'yows' meaning 'ewes' !

I've also heard daughter pronounced 'dowter'.

And the fact that when a male is described as a 'rum youth' or 'rum yowth' it can be anything from a six year old boy to a man of ninety!

A few more I have heard:

'Beerts' - 'boots',

'skeg' - 'look',

'neb' - 'noseying', these are some I remember from school days.
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Postby plook » Wed Aug 08, 2007 11:39 am

mafted, meaning I'm hot
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Postby DF » Wed Aug 08, 2007 8:12 pm

My Dad spoke nothing but Broad Yorkshire of the East Riding variety.
a couple most often used:-

Nou then ou aa ya - now then how are you.

Aas gaain dount feeat trod - I am going down the footpath.

Deant sweer wielt bairnsr eer - Don't swear while the children are here.

Odd thee noise - Be quiet.

Aad as leeave ungr than wourk tillt mornin - After a good tea I would rather hunger than work until morning.

If you ever get the chance to hear Margaret Woodcock of Burton Flemming (Or should I say Noth Bottn) her poems are magic - she has everyone in stitches.
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Postby mumoftwoboys » Sun Aug 12, 2007 8:05 pm

Yukking - to pull hard at something

My husband of 16 years (from Liverpool) still amazes at the number of new verbs he's sure I invent just to confuse him!!

Mafted and skeg being just 2!!

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